Turning the Book Wheel
A tumblr of semi-random stuff from the stacks of the Smithsonian Libraries
15 of April, 2014

todaysdocument:

It’s April 15 - Are Your Taxes Done?

State-of-the-art systems at internalrevenueservice are waiting to process your returns!

While punch cards and tape drives seem archaic now, they were a “new dimension” in data processing and tax administration at the time of this IRS educational film, “Right on the Button,” from the late 1960s. 

Excerpted from “Right on the Button." From the series: Motion Picture Films, ca. 1960 - ca. 1970. Records of the Internal Revenue Service, 1791 - 2006.

Now, go finish those taxes!


Posted 14 hours ago
Tags:  #taxes  #todaysdocument  #IRS  #computers  #punch cards  #blinky lights  #tapes  #gif  #i love these gifs!!!

1,944 notes
15 of April, 2014

Spring is finally here in Washington, DC and even though the cherry blossoms are beginning to fade, they will always look good in Shin-bijutsukai., 1901-1902


Posted 17 hours ago
Tags:  #cherry blossoms  #sakura  #japanese design  #flowers  #design  #pattern

566 notes
Dutch mathematician,astronomer, physicist, and inventor of the pendulum clock, Christiaan Huygens was born TDIH 1629.
Check out his Systema Saturnium where he describes the rings of Saturn and discovers Titan, and the Orion nebula.
14 of April, 2014

Dutch mathematician,astronomer, physicist, and inventor of the pendulum clock, Christiaan Huygens was born TDIH 1629.

Check out his Systema Saturnium where he describes the rings of Saturn and discovers Titan, and the Orion nebula.


Posted 1 day ago
Tags:  #astronomers  #mathematicians  #science  #smart guy

107 notes
Stained glass, disco style.
Le vitrail; son histoire, ses manifestations à travers les âges et les peuples (1896)
11 of April, 2014

Stained glass, disco style.

Le vitrail; son histoire, ses manifestations à travers les âges et les peuples (1896)


Posted 4 days ago
Tags:  #gif  #stained glass  #illustration  #book  #vitrail  #animation

94 notes
Poets are the trumpets which sing to battle.
Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.
-Percy Bysshe Shelley
another from The Art of the Book
10 of April, 2014

Poets are the trumpets which sing to battle.

Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.

-Percy Bysshe Shelley

another from The Art of the Book


Posted 5 days ago
Tags:  #shelley  #poets  #poetry month  #book arts

277 notes
9 of April, 2014

Last week while at the Missouri Botanical Garden for a meeting, I had a tour of the library’s rare book room from head librarian Doug Holland. 
The books pictured are two editions of the Gart der Gesundheit  (“Garden of Health”) one of the most influential early works on medicinal plants. The top image is from a later edition published by the original publisher, Peter Schoeffer, and the bottom 3 are from a “pirated” 1487 edition published by Hamsen Schönsperger. 

The phone picture being compared to the Schönsperger page is of the female mandrake found in the New York Public Library’s copy of the book.


Posted 6 days ago
Tags:  #herbals  #medicinal plants  #renaissance  #bonus shelf pictures because they are so pretty  #mandrake  #incunabula

601 notes
Reblogging ourselves because April is not just poetry month - it’s also frog month! and as we know, it’s not easy being green.

Another illustration for frog month! Hyla baudini by J. Green in Albert Günther’s Biologia Centrali Americana, Reptilia and Batrachia, 1885-1902 [DETAIL] (by Smithsonian Libraries)
see the entire plate and other images of frogs from this publication in the Biodiversity Heritage Library. 
8 of April, 2014

Reblogging ourselves because April is not just poetry month - it’s also frog month! and as we know, it’s not easy being green.

Another illustration for frog month! Hyla baudini by J. Green in Albert Günther’s Biologia Centrali Americana, Reptilia and Batrachia, 1885-1902 [DETAIL] (by Smithsonian Libraries)

see the entire plate and other images of frogs from this publication in the Biodiversity Heritage Library

(via smithsonianlibraries)


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #frog  #hyla baudini  #frog month  #reblog  #33

151 notes
We may not have a wide collection of books on poetry, but sometimes poetry finds its way into other areas of our collections. Such is the case with The Art of the Book, a Review of Some Recent European and American Work in Typography, Page Decoration & Binding in our Cooper-Hewitt National Design Library. The focus may be on the binding and typography, but the content can be just as delightful. Here is a page designed by Charles Braithwaite for Cuala Press, the private press set up by William Butler Yeats’s sister, Elizabeth.
The Lover Tells of the Rose in His Heart
All things uncomely and broken, all things worn out and old,The cry of a child by the roadway, the creak of a lumbering cart,The heavy steps of the ploughman, splashing the wintry mould,Are wronging your image that blossoms a rose in the deeps of my heart.The wrong of unshapely things is a wrong too great to be told;I hunger to build them anew and sit on a green knoll apart,With the earth and the sky and the water, re-made, like a casket of goldFor my dreams of your image that blossoms a rose in the deeps of my heart.
—William Butler Yeats
7 of April, 2014

We may not have a wide collection of books on poetry, but sometimes poetry finds its way into other areas of our collections. Such is the case with The Art of the Book, a Review of Some Recent European and American Work in Typography, Page Decoration & Binding in our Cooper-Hewitt National Design Library. The focus may be on the binding and typography, but the content can be just as delightful. Here is a page designed by Charles Braithwaite for Cuala Press, the private press set up by William Butler Yeats’s sister, Elizabeth.

The Lover Tells of the Rose in His Heart

All things uncomely and broken, all things worn out and old,
The cry of a child by the roadway, the creak of a lumbering cart,
The heavy steps of the ploughman, splashing the wintry mould,
Are wronging your image that blossoms a rose in the deeps of my heart.
The wrong of unshapely things is a wrong too great to be told;
I hunger to build them anew and sit on a green knoll apart,
With the earth and the sky and the water, re-made, like a casket of gold
For my dreams of your image that blossoms a rose in the deeps of my heart.

—William Butler Yeats


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #poem  #poetry month  #book arts  #typography  #small press  #arts and crafts  #yeats  #william butler yeats

165 notes
To answer the question no one was asking: how many elves does it take to run an electrical line? (answer: 6)
From Popular electricity in plain English (1910)
4 of April, 2014

To answer the question no one was asking: how many elves does it take to run an electrical line? (answer: 6)

From Popular electricity in plain English (1910)


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #electricity  #periodicals  #elves  #what the what?

110 notes
The Grammar of Ornament
Turkish No. 3
"From the dome of the tomb of Soliman 1. Constantinople"
3 of April, 2014

The Grammar of Ornament

Turkish No. 3

"From the dome of the tomb of Soliman 1. Constantinople"


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #turkish  #design  #pattern  #ornament  #red

267 notes
April is poetry month, so here’s a little Spring verse for the children from Peter Parley’s Primer (1835) from our children’s book collection in the library of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum.
2 of April, 2014

April is poetry month, so here’s a little Spring verse for the children from Peter Parley’s Primer (1835) from our children’s book collection in the library of the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum.


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #poetry  #children's books  #violet  #spring  #poetry month

224 notes
smithsonianlibraries:

Today in 1835, Richard E. Locke, writing for the New York Sun, published an account of life discovered on the moon by noted British astronomer Sir John Herschel. Here, in a portfolio of images from Leopoldo Galluzzo’s Altre scoverte fatte nella luna dal Sigr. Herschel , (1836) winged moon men (or “Moon Yetis” as we call them today) hunt moon bison and braid their girlfriend’s hair.
More from this publication.
More about the discovery.
1 of April, 2014

smithsonianlibraries:

Today in 1835, Richard E. Locke, writing for the New York Sun, published an account of life discovered on the moon by noted British astronomer Sir John Herschel. Here, in a portfolio of images from Leopoldo Galluzzo’s Altre scoverte fatte nella luna dal Sigr. Herschel , (1836) winged moon men (or “Moon Yetis” as we call them today) hunt moon bison and braid their girlfriend’s hair.

More from this publication.

More about the discovery.


Posted 2 weeks ago
Tags:  #reblog  #moon yetis  #April 1st  #Astronomy

333 notes
smithsonian:

As Smithsonian fans, we know you have a lot of opinions. Now there’s a way to share them: The Smithsonian Fan Forum. From exhibition titles, gallery names, or thoughts on social media or extinct birds, we want your ideas and your experiences to help us make the big decisions that affect all of our online and in-person visitors.Interested? Join our audience panel and weigh in on important Smithsonian decisions.
31 of March, 2014

smithsonian:

As Smithsonian fans, we know you have a lot of opinions. Now there’s a way to share them: The Smithsonian Fan Forum

From exhibition titles, gallery names, or thoughts on social media or extinct birds, we want your ideas and your experiences to help us make the big decisions that affect all of our online and in-person visitors.

Interested? Join our audience panel and weigh in on important Smithsonian decisions.


Posted 2 weeks ago
Tags:  #Smithsonian  #volunteer  #fan forum  #reblog

102 notes
31 of March, 2014

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

Today’s #MONDAYMINDMELTER is Oscar Bluemner’s painting diary, which details his developing skills and approach to color theory.

The diary, via archivesofamericanart, is written in English and German - many pages of the project are already partially transcribed but need more work or review. Greater detail in the transcription from these sketches would be so useful - they’re found on pages 52 and 100 of the Bluemner project. 

Jump into this 161-page project and also see 13 black and white sketches and 6 colored sketches of countryside and landscape scenes. Let us know how you do with this project - either here or send us a message!


Posted 2 weeks ago
Tags:  #smithsoniantranscriptioncenter  #archives of american art  #manuscripts  #diary  #Oscar Bluemner  #reblog  #transcription

103 notes
Cogito ergo sum. Happy Birthday René Descartes (1596-1650)
31 of March, 2014

Cogito ergo sum. 
Happy Birthday René Descartes (1596-1650)


Posted 2 weeks ago
Tags:  #Descartes  #mathematicians  #portrait  #TDIH  #or is it bibo ergo sum?  #Yes I am only posting this so I can make that Monty Python reference in Latin

110 notes