Turning the Book Wheel
A tumblr of semi-random stuff from the stacks of the Smithsonian Libraries
We know there’s quite a big DC Comics fandom here on Tumblr, so we are hoping you’ll do us a favor and vote for the Smithsonian Libraries’ copy of Wonder Woman #1 as the most iconic image in the Smithsonian! The comic was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston (who incidentally also helped invent the polygraph) as a way to bolster a more powerful feminine archetype. Not only does our branch, the Dibner Library of History and Technology, hold many Wonder Woman comics, it is also the home to Marston’s papers.
Wonder Woman #1 broke new ground with its hero’s winning combination of strength, smarts, and style. Her backstory has closely followed many of the major shifts in American history, merging fiction, modern technology, and early feminist morality. Today she continues to wield her signature Lasso of Truth, empowering her loyal fans both women and men alike.
Vote today!
28 of July, 2014

We know there’s quite a big DC Comics fandom here on Tumblr, so we are hoping you’ll do us a favor and vote for the Smithsonian Libraries’ copy of Wonder Woman #1 as the most iconic image in the Smithsonian! The comic was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston (who incidentally also helped invent the polygraph) as a way to bolster a more powerful feminine archetype. Not only does our branch, the Dibner Library of History and Technology, hold many Wonder Woman comics, it is also the home to Marston’s papers.

Wonder Woman #1 broke new ground with its hero’s winning combination of strength, smarts, and style. Her backstory has closely followed many of the major shifts in American history, merging fiction, modern technology, and early feminist morality. Today she continues to wield her signature Lasso of Truth, empowering her loyal fans both women and men alike.

Vote today!


Posted 19 minutes ago
Tags:  #DC comics  #SIShowdown  #Wonder Woman  #DC Universe  #gif  #DC  #WW  #Smithsonian  #Amazons  #comics  #libraries  #stars  #epilepsy warning  #because we know Wonder Woman would trigger warning her posts  #wouldn't she  #William Moulton Marston  #Dibner Library  #History

31 notes

Children’s Books in a Dog House

25 of July, 2014

udspeccoll:

This series of children’s books, produced around 1911, includes classic stories such as “Little Boy Blue” and “Mistress Mary.” The series is housed in a paper mache dog inspired by Buster Brown’s beloved pet in the classic comic strip.

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Read Out Loud Books. Dodd & Mead, 1911. Special Collections, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.

cute! but maybe also a little creepy.


Posted 2 days ago
Tags:  #UDel  #special collections  #buster brown  #dog  #little boy blue  #library  #children's books  #reblog

189 notes
Good catch, Mrs. Wm. R. Farrington of Poughkeepsie, NY!
From: Forest & Stream - vol. 45 (1895)
25 of July, 2014

Good catch, Mrs. Wm. R. Farrington of Poughkeepsie, NY!

From: Forest & Stream - vol. 45 (1895)


Posted 3 days ago
Tags:  #fishing  #forest and scream  #gone fishing  #muskie  #esox masquinongy  #19th Century  #photo  #fisherwoman

83 notes
25 of July, 2014

lindahall:

Andreas Libavius - Scientist of the Day

Andreas Libavius, a German chemist, died July 25, 1616, at about 56 years of age. In 1597, Libavius published a book, Alchymia, that, in spite of its title, is seen by many modern chemists as the foundation book of their discipline. Libavius at the time preferred the word “alchemy” to “chemistry” because the latter word had been co-opted by followers of Paracelsus and was a mystical, magical art practiced in secrecy, mostly at the courts of such rulers as Rudolf II. Libavius wanted chemistry to be an academic and a laboratory discipline, divorced from astrology and natural magic, and concerned only with the nature of matter and its combinations, and he wanted it taught openly in the universities, not hidden away at royal courts. Libavius was none too pleased when the first professorship of chemistry was finally established at Marburg in 1609, because the professor appointed was Johannes Hartmann, a Paracelsian and a favorite at the court of Moritz of Hesse. But Libavius’s attitude did ultimately win the day, and although his word “alchymia” was replaced by “chemiatria”, everything else he argued for came to pass, as chemistry came to be established as an open empirical science, based on observations and experiments accessible to every practitioner. We have five of Libavius’s original works in the History of Science Collection, including 1st and 2nd editions of his Alchymia.

Our copy of the second edition of the Alchymia is an especially handsome specimen, with its stamped vellum boards still held closed by a beautiful pair of bronze clasps. The second edition is important because, unlike the 1st (1597) edition, it has a number of woodcuts illustrating an ideal modern chemical laboratory, including a design for the building itself, and plans for all sorts of furnaces and alembics for distillation.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City


Posted 3 days ago
Tags:  #reblog  #Scientists  #17th century  #alchemy  #chemistry  #Andreas Libavius  #Libavius  #histsci  #linda hall

115 notes
24 of July, 2014

In anticipation of Owl Awareness Day (August 4), we offer some slightly cartoony illustrations of these fascinating members of the genus Strix.

Images taken from Captain Thomas Brown’s “Illustrations of the American ornithology of Alexander Wilson and Charles Lucian Bonaparte" (1835).


Posted 4 days ago
Tags:  #owls  #birds  #illustration  #Ornithology

420 notes
23 of July, 2014

mypubliclands:

usfwspacific:

Happy Batman Day! There may only be one “caped crusader”, but did you know there are about 1300 different kinds of bats worldwide? They may not be fighting crime, but they sure are busy making the world a better place by pollinating our crops and taking care of pesky insects.  
Bats live almost everywhere on Earth, except for the most extreme desert and polar regions. So chances are, there are bats where you live. Let’s meet a few of these superheroes of the nocturnal animal world in the Pacific Region.
Photo 1 - Marianas fruit bat: lives in Guam’s limestone forests and can have a wingspan of up to 3.5 feet! These gentle giants are important for pollinating and dispersing seeds of popular tropical fruits like coconut, papaya, and figs. Photo credit: Julia Boland/USFWS
Photo 2 - Townsend’s big-eared bat: Aptly named, their ears are over an inch long. That may seem small to you, but that’s a quarter of their entire body length! Can you imagine having ears almost a foot and a half long? Photo credit: Ann Froschauer/USFWS
Photo 3 - Pallid bats: Awesome listeners that use those big ears to detect the footsteps of their prey on the ground. Swooping in silently from above, these larger bats often eat scorpions and centipedes,crickets, grasshoppers and beetles.Photo credit: Ann Froschauer/USFWS
Photo 4: Spotted bats: Have the largest ears of any North American species, and those pearly pink ears and black and white spotted fur give it a very distinctive look. This bat also has one of the only echolocation calls that humans can hear. Photo credit: Paul Cryan
Photo 5: Hawaiian hoary bats: are the only land mammal native to the Hawaiian islands. The  ‘ope‘ape‘ as it’s called in Hawaii arrived on the islands some 10,000 years ago. That was quite a migration from North America, over 2,400 miles across the ocean! Photo credit: Paul Bonaccorso
Batty for bats? Check out these great resources: 
Bat Conservation International (bats worldwide) http://www.batcon.org/
Western Bat Working Group (bats in western North America) http://www.wbwg.org/


Love this Happy Batman Day post from our friends at USFWS!  And if these bats make you want more, check out our My Public Lands posts tagged “bats”!  http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/tagged/bats

bats!!


Posted 4 days ago
Tags:  #happybatmanday  #science  #wildlife  #bats  #superhero  #mypubliclands  #animals  #cute animals  #habitat  #conservation  #nature  #reblog

295 notes
The white lily, lilium album, from New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus… (1807) by Robert Thornton. 
23 of July, 2014

The white lily, lilium album, from New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus… (1807) by Robert Thornton. 


Posted 5 days ago
Tags:  #lily  #lillies  #illustration  #mourning  #flowers

238 notes
smithsonianlibraries:

This is exactly what is needed in the Libraries - forget carrels and collaborative meeting spaces -  HAMMOCKS.

Reblogging ourselves because it’s “National Hammock Day” - why not? There’s a surprise hammock aficionado if you check out the entire brochure for J.B. Patterson’s Textile Novelties.
22 of July, 2014

smithsonianlibraries:

This is exactly what is needed in the Libraries - forget carrels and collaborative meeting spaces -  HAMMOCKS.

Reblogging ourselves because it’s “National Hammock Day” - why not? There’s a surprise hammock aficionado if you check out the entire brochure for J.B. Patterson’s Textile Novelties.


Posted 6 days ago
Tags:  #Hammock  #advertisement  #trade literature  #Sir I need to know where I can get some business hammocks  #Hammocks? My goodness what an idea. Why didn't I think of that? Hammocks! Homer there's four places.  #There's the Hammock Hut -that's on third.  #There's Hammocks-R-Us that's on third too.  #You got Put-Your-Butt-There?  #That's on third  #Swing Low Sweet Chariot... Matter of fact they're all in the same complex; it's the hammock complex on third.  #simpsons  #gratuitous tagging  #i promise i will stop with the tagging for a while after this

168 notes

Correction

21 of July, 2014

It has been brought to my attention that in the tags on last week’s post for Cow Appreciation Day (not really a holiday) the link to the YouTube video for the song “I Like Cows" by the Minneapolis band The Suburbs, which I quoted from liberally, was incorrect.

It has been amended for your listening pleasure. If you like that sort of thing.

~Keri


Posted 6 days ago
Tags:  #correction  #this does not constitute an endorsement of The Suburbs by the Smithsonian Libraries  #it does however date some of our employees  #for the record I did not see them in the early 80's but during their comeback in 1993

15 notes
Oh, hello there!
Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)
21 of July, 2014

Oh, hello there!

Friendly skeleton from Natural History for the use of schools and families (1864)


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #gif  #skeleton  #waving  #howdy  #hello  #anatomy  #human anatomy  #bones

1,143 notes
21 of July, 2014

lindahall:

Jean Picard - Scientist of the Day

Jean Picard, a French astronomer, was born July 21, 1620. In 1669-70, Picard successfully measured the length of a degree of latitude.   He carved up eighty miles of open country north of Paris into 13 adjoining triangles. He carefully measured one side of one triangle with measuring rods, and then measured all the other sides by triangulating with precision quadrants. After he had thus measured this line of triangles, he set up a zenith telescope (one that looks straight up) at the two endpoints and sighted on a star, and determined that the two endpoints were 1 degree and 12 minutes apart. He concluded, therefore, that for a separation of precisely one degree, the two points would be 69.07 miles apart, which is thus the length of one degree of latitude at the latitude of Paris. Assuming the earth were a perfect sphere and every degree were like every other, this would mean that the earth has a circumference of 24,865 miles.

Within the next eighty years, it would be discovered by a French expedition to Ecuador that a degree of latitude on the equator is shorter than one at Paris, and another French expedition would determine that both are shorter than one in Lapland. This means that the earth is not a sphere, but is shaped more like a grapefruit, being wider at the equator than through the poles. Picard’s Mesure de la Terre (1671, issued 1676) was one of the first publications of the recently-founded Paris Academy of Sciences; we have a copy in the History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #reblog  #lindahall  #17th century  #geodesy  #Jean Picard  #Picard  #zenith sector  #shape of the earth  #meridian  #Academie des Sciences  #histsci  #history of science

148 notes
Catalog of patterns for hairwork including rings, bracelets, watch fobs, and of course designs for mourning jewelry.Per the price list in the back, the mourning hair art pictured would be $7.50-$13 including frame. Bargain?
For more hairwork, check out the blog post one of our librarians at the Cooper-Hewitt  wrote.
18 of July, 2014

Catalog of patterns for hairwork including rings, bracelets, watch fobs, and of course designs for mourning jewelry.
Per the price list in the back, the mourning hair art pictured would be $7.50-$13 including frame. Bargain?

For more hairwork, check out the blog post one of our librarians at the Cooper-Hewitt  wrote.


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #mourning jewelry  #hairwork  #mourning  #willow  #design  #VIctorian

125 notes
17 of July, 2014

For this throwback Thursday, a pic of Smithsonian Libraries’ wonderful Interlibrary Loan staff with some cutting edge 1994 technology (note the “pen” style barcode scanner.) As a bonus - the view of our catalog in 1994.
50% of those pictured are still wonderful, and still with Interlibrary Loan  - lookin’ good Mike (far right) and Wanda (far left)! 


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #IFTTT  #Instagram  #throwbackthursday  #I hated those barcode scanners  #1994  #1994 was twenty years ago omg  #libraries  #librarian

158 notes
Who remembers the days before digital photography? The fumes in the darkroom, the surprise when your picture actually turned out, the thumbs….oh, the thumbs!
Kodak film ad from the early 20th century. From the National Museum of American History Library’s trade literature collection. 
16 of July, 2014

Who remembers the days before digital photography? The fumes in the darkroom, the surprise when your picture actually turned out, the thumbs….oh, the thumbs!

Kodak film ad from the early 20th century. From the National Museum of American History Library’s trade literature collection


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #IFTTT  #Kodak  #film  #advertising  #trade literature  #photography

227 notes
In some circles, July 15th is celebrated as National Cow Appreciation Day, but here in the Libraries it’s always cow appreciation day - so go out there and give that special heifer in your life a big hug!
Image taken from “Van Pelt’s Cow Demonstration" (1911).
15 of July, 2014

In some circles, July 15th is celebrated as National Cow Appreciation Day, but here in the Libraries it’s always cow appreciation day - so go out there and give that special heifer in your life a big hug!

Image taken from “Van Pelt’s Cow Demonstration" (1911).


Posted 1 week ago
Tags:  #cow  #cow appreciation day  #TDIH  #I like cows  #and they like me  #i like cows  #just wait and see  #when they go mooo  #hey mooove over  #well i like cows  #i like to watch them eat  #they don't mooove when they eat  #the repeating verses of that song don't work well as tags so i will stop now  #The Suburbs  #http://youtu.be/pkZy4yChJkU

189 notes